August
15

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Paul Rand designs

Link: http://designrelated.com/inspiration/view/mattmatt/entry/1580/paul-rand

Paul Rand designs
On August 15th, 1914, Peretz Rosenbaum was born to an Orthodox Jewish home in Brooklyn, New York.
Peretz Rosenbaum would grow up to become an icon in the field of graphic design, better known as Paul Rand.

"...Rand did not set out to reform graphic design, he just wanted to be the best at what he did. Reared in the commercial art production departments — or `bullpens' — of New York's publishing and advertising industries, he understood the demands of the marketplace and accepted that design was a service not an end, or an art, in itself. Yet he was critical of the poor aesthetic standards that prevailed, maintaining that everyday life — especially commercial art — could be enriched by the artist's touch. He modelled himself on avant-garde artists, such as painter Paul Klee, designer El Lissitzky and architect Le Corbusier, each of whom advocated a timeless spirit in design..."
excerpt from Paul Rand monograph by Steven Heller


In my small collection of Paul Rand related items, I have a book that is said to be from Paul Rand's personal library. The first edition copy of Modern Book Design by Ruari McLean (c.1951), has a personalized inscription and an extra notation in the index. The pencil notations are from Helen Federico. When I purchased the book the seller provided this note about the history:

Helen Federico worked in Weintraub & Co.'s art department (1943-1951) under Paul Rand. And the Rands (Paul and Anne) and the Federicos (Helen and Gene) dined regularly together. Helen Federico would be a major source for Steve Heller's Paul Rand monograph. Gene Federico worked for Doyle Dane Bernbach (1951-54) and he went on to create a substantial body of work and received many graphic design honors.




Here is a book jacket design and a couple of paperback cover designs by Paul Rand.





In 1941 Paul Rand designed the logo for the Coronet brand. I'm not sure of the date for the below giant brandy snifter featuring Paul Rand's design and illustrative character logo.



more links about Paul Rand:
Paul Rand's Book Jackets and Covers / SVA MFA Designer as Author video
Identity Presentation for American Express design / Paul-Rand.com
Paul Rand's Final Logo? / Speak Up
1972 Hall of Fame: Paul Rand / Art Directors Club
History of Modern Design: Graphics and Products since the Industrial Revolution / Google Books
Portraits of Paul Rand / Paul-Rand.com
Remembering Paul Rand / Design Observer
Paul Rand modern graphic design fan club / flickr
Video of Steven Heller & Paul Rand interview / youtube
Paul Rand / RIT Graphic Design Archive
Paul Rand in Pink / Inspiration Resource
Paul Rand, Anti-War, Pro-Typographer / A Journey Round My Skull
Paul Rand Obituary from 1996 / The New York Times
Objectify Me: Steven Heller on Paul Rand's can / Objectified
Paul Rand's Children's Books / Daddy Types
Sparkle and Spin by Ann and Paul Rand / Chronicle Books
Paul Rand book covers / Scott Lindberg on flickr
The Trademark as an Illustrative Device / Paul-Rand.com
Paul Rand: Conversations with Students / Google Books
Steve Jobs on Paul Rand's NeXT logo video / youtube
Papa Logo / Metropolis
Designer Paul Rand Speaks at Media Lab / MIT
Paul Rand timeline (1914-1996) / Paul-Rand.com
 

January
21

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Remembering Design Legend, Shigeo Fukuda

Link: http://astore.amazon.com/designrelated-20/detail/155297913X

Remembering Design Legend, Shigeo Fukuda
Shigeo Fukuda / Fukuda San (1932 – 2009) 
    "...Traditionally, Japanese designers looked to the West for innovative solutions. This is no longer the case. The winds are shifting toward an easterly direction. Shigeo Fukuda, Japan's Houdini of Design, is a welcome part of the shifting breeze. His visual originality and deep dedication to worthwhile causes help keep the sun shining brightly over our ever changing, complex world." — excerpt from biography by The Art Directors Club (c. 1987)

Graphic Designer Shigeo Fukuda, passed away on January 11th, 2009 at the age of 76. He was a master of creating optical illusions, simplistic logos, and designing bold and engaging posters. In 1987 Fukuda was the first Japanese designer to be inducted in the Art Directors Club (ADC) Hall of Fame.



I first discovered Sigeo Fukuda's work in the book Book Design of Graphic Designers in Japan (a few quick spreads below):



More on Shigeo Fukuda:
 

October
26

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Last Updated: October 27, 2008

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Remembering CBS Design Legend, Lou Dorfsman

Link: http://www.thecenterfordesignstudy.com/support.htm

Remembering CBS Design Legend, Lou Dorfsman
Louis Dorfsman (1918-2008)

"For 41 years, (1946 to 1987), alongside William S. Paley and Frank Stanton, CBS SVP Lou Dorfsman ushered in the Golden Age of Broadcast Television. Managing design and advertising Lou Dorfsman sculpted a new medium and crafted the CBS brand; his creations deftly touched our lives, shaped our culture, and informed both our values and beliefs." — Icon of American Design History, The Center for Design Study
Last week I heard the sad news that designer Lou Dorfsman died. After seeing there wasn't a large variety of Lou Dorfsman's work available to view online, I turned to my small stash of old design annuals. The quality of the scans below don't do his work justice, but do give a partial sense of the diversity of design projects Lou Dorfsman designed and/or art directed while working at CBS

Art Directors: Louis Dorfsman /Kurt Weihs, Designer: Kurt Weihs (found in the 41st Annual of Advertising & Editorial Design /1962 The Art Directors Club)

Art Director: Louis Dorfsman Designer: Louis Dorfsman / Alphonso Amato, Artist: Alphonso Amato, Copywriters: Louis Dorfsman, Larry Grossman (found in the 41st Annual of Advertising & Editorial Design /1962 The Art Directors Club)


Art Director: Louis Dorfsman, Designer: Louis Dorfsman / J. Schindelman, Copywriters: Louis Dorfsman, Robert Strunsky
(found in the 41st Annual of Advertising & Editorial Design /1962 The Art Directors Club)

Art Director, Designer & Copywriter: Louis Dorfsman, Artist: Old Engraving—Charles Korbett
(found in the 41st Annual of Advertising & Editorial Design /1962 The Art Directors Club)

Art Director & Designer: Louis Dorfsman, Designer: Alphonso Amato, Artist: John Pistilli, Copywriters: Louis Dorfsman, Robert Strunsky, Alphonso Amato
(found in the 41st Annual of Advertising & Editorial Design /1962 The Art Directors Club)
Art Director: Louis Dorfsman, Artist: Tomi Ungerer (found in the Graphis Annual 65/66)
Art Director: Louis Dorfsman, Designers: Akihiko Seki, Lou Dorfsman, Artist: Akihiko Seki
(found in the 56th Art Directors Club Annual)
Art Director, Designer & Artist: Lou Dorfsman, Producer: Edstan Studio (found in the film titles section of the 56th Art Directors Club Annual)
_____________________________________________________________________
This morning I found a thoughtful obituary by Steven Heller for The New York Times, and a small article on CBS News. Below I've collected a list of online resources on the life and work of Lou Dorfsman along with information on how to help preserve part of his legacy by donating to save the Gastrotypographicalassemblage wall. 

more on Lou Dorfsman:

Here is a video from 2001 on the history of the CBS logo, in which Lou Dorfsman is interviewed:
______________________________________________________________
In honor of Lou Dorfsman's legacy please consider helping The Center for Design Study restore Dorfsman's masterpiece, the Gastrotypographicalassemblage wall (previously in the CBS cafeteria).
Below is a visual slideshow about Lou Dorfsman and the CBS Wall (the audio comes from an old CBS radio interview). A higher quality version is available via The Center for Design Study.
In response to the importance of the Gastrotypographicalassemblage restoration efforts, Michael Bierut says:
    "Considering how important graphic design is to the life of our visual culture, it's depressing how casually we treat work that would properly be considered iconic in any other field. The astonishing typographical wall that Lou Dorfsman designed for the CBS cafeteria is an irreplaceable piece of design history. The efforts of The Center for Design Study  to restore this virtuoso piece of graphic design is well worth supporting, not least of all as an example of how to show proper respect to the artifacts upon which our profession's legacy is built."

photo credit for the top photograph of Lou Dorfsman standing in front of the Gastrotypographicalassemblage wall in the CBS cafeteria:  Sara Krulwich / New York Times
 

August
11

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Alexander Girard (1907-1993), Timeless Designs Revived

Link: http://astore.amazon.com/designrelated-20/detail/076431579X/105-3063345

Alexander Girard (1907-1993), Timeless Designs Revived
Earlier this year I saw the colorful Alexander Girard Alphabet Blocks created by House Industries (a beautiful collaboration between them and the Alexander Girard estate).
Truthfully, I had no idea who Alexander Girard was...
Then today while flipping through the summer catalog for FLOR, I came across their new La Fonda Del Sol line of interchangeable floor tiles, based on Girard’s extensive design work for the restaurant of the same name (which was in the Time-Life Building from 1961-1971).* 
“Like all great designers, Alexander Girard never forgot that his work must be ultimately practical - he just made sure to imbue his designs with a whole lot of sophisticated yet fun boldness. We humbly aim for the same at FLOR. Our La Fonda del Sol™ area rug collection captures the whimsy and vibrancy of Alexander Girard's folk art designs while remaining infinitely flexible and practical FLOR.” —FLOR



(above photos of rugs from Flor. The following La Fonda Del Sol sets are shown above, in the order they appear: AzulMandarinaVerde, and Pequeno
This was enough for me to head to Wikipedia and look up other resources on this great talent.
Maximo is another company that has been creating products based on Girard’s designs, including bags, tables and pillows.
Here are some fun Alexander Girard wooden doll figurines manufactured by Vitra.
The SFMOMA had an exhibition on Alexander Girard last year.
Even Todd Oldham has a short video essay on the versatile designer (below):
.
*coincidentally a modern version of the restaurant La Fonda Del Sol is scheduled to open in the MetLife building in NY sometime this fall. The designated designer for the project is Adam Tihany. In response to the original restaurant’s aesthetics established by Girard, Tihany says “It was very sophisticated for its time, but what worked then, doesn’t work now. Tastes have changed. Golden suns? So don’t expect an homage to Girard in Tihany’s scheme for the street-side bar-lounge and raised dining room. “But if you know, you might see a trail. The pattern of the terrazzo floor hints of the tile he used on the counters. And that pink appears in the upholstery pattern.” (quote pulled from the Insatiable Critic)
 

June
24

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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Topic: Book Design

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TOPIC / Book Design

Phaidon's Le Corbusier LeGrand

Link: http://astore.amazon.com/designrelated-20/detail/0714846686/105-0666396

Phaidon's Le Corbusier LeGrand
Le Corbusier (1887-1965)

Phaidon'€™s massive monograph (about 20 pounds) on the multi-faceted designer and architect, LeCorbusier, will be released on July 2, 2008. The beautiful, but heavy book (in the style of Warhol “Giant Size”) comes in a slipcase and includes a supplementary book of translations and transcriptions for all the original documents archived within the book. Le Grand was compiled by the Phaidon editors and includes an intro essay by Jean-Louis Cohen.

The monograph is packed with rare photographs, urban plans, sketches, and letters between Le Corbusier and other prominent design figures.


Sketches of the
Grand Comfort Chair be Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand, page 195


Cover, Des Canons, des munitions?, page 318


Le Corbusier with a Modular-related model, page 376


Schematic drawing for
Unité (1946), page 413


Living and dining areas of Mason A, page 681

Julia Hasting designed the book.

 

June
19

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Erik Nitsche — 1950s Ads for General Dynamics

Link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/eriknitsche/407245953/in/set-7215759458728

Erik Nitsche — 1950s Ads for General Dynamics
A small set of very nicely designed General Dynamics ads by Erik Nitsche have been added to an already great body of his design work on flickr.

(Thank you to flickr users Derrick and Katie from BustBright for creating this visual resource)
 

June
01

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Last Updated: November 16, 2010

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Topic: Fashion

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TOPIC / Fashion

1962 Yves Saint Laurent Fashion Show

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwuuWiKn5ik

1962 Yves Saint Laurent Fashion Show
Vintage video clip from 1962 Yves Saint Laurent fashion show (with English subtitles)
 

June
01

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Last Updated: June 01, 2008

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TOPIC / Furniture Design

Eero Saarinen Video from Past Retrospective at Cranbrook

Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwTJqf9Cv14&feature=related

Eero Saarinen Video from Past Retrospective at Cranbrook


“Eero Saarinen ÂœShaping the Future project at Cranbrook. Eero Saarinen was the son of the celebrated Finnish architect and first President of the Cranbrook Academy of Art, Eliel Saarinen.” (Metromode video on YouTube)
 

June
01

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TOPIC / Furniture Design

George Nelson (1908-1986) and the Pretzel Chair

George Nelson (1908-1986) and the Pretzel Chair
In honor of George Nelson’s 100th birthday, Vitra has released a special re-edition (limited to 1,000) of Nelson’s Pretzel Chair (from 1952).




“n the 1950s, George Nelson and his New York office developed a series of individually expressive seating furniture, a number of which have long established themselves as classics. In 1952, predating the famous Coconut Chair or the Marshmallow Sofa, he designed a chair made of moulded plywood originally referred to simply as the “Laminated Chair”. The bold and elegant curve of the seat back and armrest soon earned it the nickname Pretzel Chair...” —from Vitra

The Pretzel Chair is by no means representative of George Nelson’s full body of work. He began his career as an architect. But when there weren’t enough new projects coming in, he turned his creativity and talents towards other areas of design, including graphic, furniture, and interior design. George Nelson was also the Associate Editor of Architectural Forum magazine from 1935-1943.

When I think of George Nelson the first designs that come to mind are his clock designs for Howard Miller (Herman Miller’s brother). The AIGA has a great article on Nelson’s legacy and also showcases the variety in his design portfolio. One of my favorites is his simplistic package design system for Abbott Laboratories (seen below)



excerpt of Articulating the Eye by Judith Nasatir:

“George Nelson was not a graphic designer. He called himself, simply, a designer. He practiced a variety of the so-called design disciplines during his fifty-odd calendar years of ceaseless professional activity. His formal training was in architecture. He became extremely well known as a furniture designer, an industrial designer, an interior designer and exhibition designer. He was in the vanguard of a quiverful of design "disciplines" which were only becoming bona fide professions, or at least ways to make a living, at the same time he began to turn his hand to them. Or when he began to write about them. Or when he began to do the work that proliferated and sneaked in many, often unexpected, directions.”

(all images of the Pretzel Chair seen here are © Vitra Design Museum)
 

February
12

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TOPIC / Graphic Design

Jean Carlu

Link: http://books.google.com/books?id=gaRRtWEH2pgC&pg=PA25&lpg=PA25&dq=jean+

Jean Carlu
Last week at the Vintage Thrift Shop, I saw the name Jean Carlu on the back of a vintage paperback, No Exit. The name sounded familiar...but I really couldn’t recall anything on this designer/artist. Upon further research, I found Jean Carlu (1900-1997) to be a fascinating person, with a wide-ranging and striking portfolio.



Jean Carlu, Journée nationale de la paix, 1936



In 1941 he received an award for the New York Art Directors Club for his poster, “America’s Answer! Production” (seen above)

excerpt from Smithsonian biography: “Born in Bonnières, France, Jean Carlu came from a family of architects and studied to enter that profession. After an accident at the age of eighteen in which he lost his right arm, Carlu turned to graphic design.”



Gift Packages for Hitler!, from the Early Series by Jean Carlu, 1942, Gift of Container Corporation of America, Smithsonian American Art Museum


Victory, Franklin D. Roosevelt

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